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[untitled]

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00:30:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Channel 24 (225 MHz)

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mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
544

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 5, Randy Campbell 4, Rebecca Delgado 3, San Francisco 3, Jennifer 2, The City 2, Ben 2, Arizona 2, Abate 1, Dr. Valerie Spicer 1, Rick Stanton 1, Rick 1, Unr 1, Dpw 1, Graffiti Vandal 1, Abate Graffiti 1, Sigma Fraternity 1, Val 1, Colin 1, Clearchannel 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    March 23, 2013
    8:30 - 9:00pm PDT  

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... >> going to get started with the award. we put out word to please recommend people for awards for graffiti fighters, whether it be volunteers programs, groups, whatever. and we got quite a few different people who recommended people. so, first i'd like to bring up dr. valerie spicer who will be -- [cheering and applauding] >> she recommended somebody. she's not getting the award. [laughter] >> hi. a couple months ago, about six months ago i was in brisbane, australia on a conference and that's where i met colin sa well. he's from the u.k. and has more
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than 20 years investigative experience in graffiti. and to be honest, some of the most complex investigations that i'm aware of. so, i did recommend him as a prime time superstar graffiti fighter and he's receiving this award today. so, colin? [cheering and applauding] [laughter] >> would you like to say a few words? >> thank you very much. thank you, val, thank you, drew. coming from the u.k., as i expressed to drew, this is one of the finest conferences i've had the pleasure to come and be a part of. thanks to the great team, thanks to you guys for making it a very, very memorable event to me. i wish you all the best. thank you very much.
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(applause) >> is rebecca delgado here? i don't believe she is. she is so posed to be showing up. the academy of arts has people who clean up around the neighborhood. the academy of arts will be receiving an award. accepting it on their behalf is me. on the next one. (applause) >> clearchannel outdoor, amazing, donated bill board, 30 bus shelters to advertise this conference. total views by this bill board in advertising, 5 million views. (applause) >> and only one of them got tagged. [laughter]
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l >> janna lord couldn't be here today to accept it. she had a family crisis. but this is for clearchannel outdoor for helping the conference. by the way, when those ads went up we were averaging 1300 hits a day on the website. (applause) >> another person who couldn't attend the award today, monica rose is our graphic artist who does a lot of work for us and she won the contest for designing the logo for the conference. pretty nice design, i think. so, monica rose will be receiving an award for the designing of the logo. she designed the programs and she designed the brochures to promote the conference. and she's already said that she's on board donating it for the 2013 conference in phoenix. (applause) >> >> rick stanton nominated somebody. rick?
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* >> if you've been working in graffiti profession for awhile, i think everybody knows randy campbell. who knows randy campbell? that's good. those of you who don't, especially if you're in law enforce. you're probably going to want to write this down. no graph.net. randy campbell has been working in graffiti cases forever and he's a retired, i think, sheriff or highway patrolman. maybe somebody can help me out there. >> highway patrol. >> highway patrolman. what he runs it's no ground.net. for law enforcement, if you're looking for a tagger you think is crossing state boundaries and you catch one and you want
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to put up that person's tag to other law enforcement agencies, he's got a network where you can do that. so, you send that in to him, he sends it out and it goes to hundreds of cities. if you're looking for somebody and you think that other cities might know who that is, put that out and he'll send it out to all those cities. so, e-mail him and get on his network. he's got a website. and he's a great resource for law enforcement specifically and everybody else, too, but law enforcement specifically to help you find graffiti vandals or to add on to cases if you do find a graffiti vandal. so, this is for randy campbell. thanks. (applause) >> good news. rebecca delgado is in the house. rebecca, would you like to come up and say a few words about your group at the academy of arts?
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>> hello, everybody. thank you very, very much. first of all, i would like to say my name is rebecca delgado and i'm a board member of the graffiti advisory as well as a volunteer for dpw. i've been a volunteer with dpw for about 10 years and a board member for about sick years. and i am actually here to nominate -- oh, before i say that, i wanted to thank all of you, by the way, for being here today for joining the conference. i'd like to thank all the people, all the organizations responsible for putting together the international conference. and thank you for visiting our city. i hope you had a great time while you're here and you will continue to explore the city this weekend. you are very lucky because we
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have a great, great weather. it was winter not too long ago. i think the last 24 hours, and today it's borderline between spring and summer. so, you guys lucked out on the weather. i nominated the academy university because of its commitment, long-time commitment and dedication to the beautification of san francisco. they, too, have been involved as a partner with dpw going on 10 years. they have supported the community clean team. the students and faculty come every month in large numbers to plant trees, pick up litter on the streets, and abate graffiti. and in addition to that, the academy adopted 16 city blocks in the city whereby our cap a sigma fraternity go out there every other weekend to abate
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graffiti. * and i was hoping that they were supposed to be here, but i told them to be here at 4:15 to accept their award. but they're not here yet and that's too bad because i wanted you guys to meet them because they are a bunch of great, great young men who really cares for the city. they're not doing it to get paid. they're not getting paid, by the way, they're not getting an extra grade for doing it. they do it because these are the new crop of young generation who cares. they love their city. they love their government. and they want to give back to our city, to give back to our country. so, hooray for them and thank you for coming. (applause) >> caitlin young.
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>> i didn't think i planned to talk. i'm caitlin young and i'm from omaha, nebraska. we nominated our senior painter, jeff nicole. he was with the city program 15 years ago, he basically ran it since it started. he ran it for 10 years by himself all over our city. and, so, just through all that he's never changed his dedication. he doesn't take shortcuts, repaint and color match and do all public and private property in our city. so, just his dedication in our program has made a huge difference in our city. we appreciate it. (applause)
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[laughter] >> congratulations. (applause) >> lisa mc kenzie. >> okay. i'm accepting this award for
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mike yeager and bill mcdonnis, [speaker not understood]. i think all the cities that have volunteer programs it's usually a handful of volunteers that do a majority of the work. these guys are both retired and they have accomplished so much within their neighborhood. they live in one of the biggest neighborhood associations -- excuse me, homeowner associations in san antonio, about 5,000 houses. so, he wrote his little speech so i'm going to read his speech. he would like to thank the stop urban blight organization on our behalf for recognizing this and bill and i are truly do not do what we do for recognition, but is very gratifying when someone takes the time and effort to tell you and the public at large that they appreciate your efforts and think you have made a difference that is worthwhile. i feel especially grateful that a national organization would do this for me. thank you on behalf of mike and bill. (applause)
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>> all right. last but not least, my personal favorite. jennifer nelson began working with me four years ago and through some downturns in the economy ended up having to leave and take a different job, was making pretty darn good money. and a year ago december jennifer approached me and said, i hate my job. she says, but i loved the nonprofit. so, jennifer. [laughter] >> please come up. (applause) >> this wouldedthctionv have happened without her. and phoenix is going to be 2013 or 2014 graffiti international. thank you, graffiti fighters. (applause) >> it's cocktail time.
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[laughter] ... >> hi, i'm with building san francisco. and we have a special program of stay safe today where we're going to talk about what you can do to your home after an earthquake to make it waterproof and to be more comfortable. we're here at spur in san francisco, this wonderful exhibit of safe enough to stay. and this is an example of what your home might be like after an earthquake. and we have today with us ben latimer from tvan.
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thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> we'll talk about things you can do you don't have to be a professional contractor to make your home more livable after an earthquake. >> i want to talk about things a homeowner can do. weave comfort and we have things like a little bit of maybe safety if your front door is ajar and waterproofing if you have a leak in your roof, or if you have broken glass on the window. >> so unr, one of the most important fib use is keeping outside out and inside in. let's look at windows. >> let's assume this window is broken in the earthquake. we have wind and rain blowing in. one of the most important things you need to do as a homeowner is secure the plastic properly. if you just take staples or nails and put them into the plastic, we're going to get a strong wind and rip it right off. what i'm going to have somebody do is they're going to have -- this is an old piece of shingle. you might have -- everybody has a piece of wood in their basement. it doesn't have to be fancy. they take out this rusty screw
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begun, and hopefully you have one of these. >> there is one at the neighborhood support center. >> at the neighborhood support center. you're going to wrap this plastic around this board, take your screw. and then screw that in. >> you need a permit for this? >> you do need a permit for this. and you can contact the former head building inspector to get that permit. that's it. now when the wind blows, it's tight and it's not going to pull through, having a single point of contact. >> great. what about this door? take a look at this door. what can you do? let's say it doesn't shut tight. what can you do? >> for the sake of argument, we're on the inside. i can't lock my door at night. i have a very similar, very similar idea. i'm going to take my 2 by 4. i can put it across the jamb in the door.
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one. two. maybe i want another one up here, maybe another one down there. but i can go to sleep. and that quickly, i can get it off in the morning. >> terrific. what about the roof up here? we see people throw blue tarps over their roof after an earthquake. that seems reasonable. >> i think the blue tarp is reasonable. the things that people want to know that they need to know is if you have multiple tarps, how you overlap. starting from the bottom and moving up so that you're overlapping this way. so, rain running down doesn't slide under your tarp. >> right. >> and the same technique we did over here, as silly as it may sound, wrapping the end of that blue tarp with your board and then securing that if you can underneath, if you have to on top is fine. but making sure that you don't have an area where the wind is going to get under and bill owe that tarp. >> the wind can rip it right off. >> and then you're back up there again. >> let's go inside and check out what we can do inside.
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>> old fun. here we go. >> so, ben, i see you have nails, universal tool right here. >> man's best friend. duct tape. let me show you a couple things we can use this for after an earthquake. this window right here, because it's off kilter, we have open seams all along. i have a lot of air coming through. i want to stay comfortable at night. i want to keep that air out. it's as simple as that, all the way around. >> excellent. >> now i don't have any air coming in. let's say this one is one that would annoy me. everything is a little off. my doors won't stay closed. i take a piece of my favorite duct tape here, close it up. and at least it will stay out of my way when i'm trying to live throughout my day. if we're not talking about pressurized water, we're talking about just the drain, sometimes they're going to get a crack here. >> right, sure. >> and you're going to get a leak. duct tape around that is going to help us get through until we can get a plumber out and get that fixed as well. let's say we only have
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electricity in one room, so we're running extension cords across the house. if i'm going to run an extension cord from one room to the other, i don't want kids tripping on it. i don't want to trippon it. i take my trusty duct tape, tape it to the floor, and i don't have to worry about it getting kicked. >> great, great. look at this. let's look at the duct tape here because we see a big -- >> yes. in the event of an earthquake, i don't think we're going to have too many -- too much debris that's safe to put into a plastic bag, even as strong as it might be. these are called vice bags. this is what they use to put rice and things when they ship it. this is something where i take my glass, i can take broken pieces of wood, i can take anything sharp and fill it. and it's not going to puncture and come out. it's not going to fall all over the floor. i've not going to have it sticking out, maybe scratch myself, cut myself or anything like that. these are a great thing to have. >> you have a little go-to box for emergencies. that's great. thanks very much for joining
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us, ben. it's really been interesting. and i want to thank you all for joining us here at the spur urban center. and we'll see you again >> you guys have some good lunch? always the worst to try to do a presentation after lung. : we'll try to make it through it. before we get started i'm supposed to make sure if you have a question, we have to use this microphone here. so, you have to wait till you get the microphone in front of you to ask a question he. * lunch that's the purpose for the audio and stuff. today we're going to talk about -- basically this is what i want to do here. i've been a detective for about six years now and been with the police department 15 years. prior to that i was in the united states army, military police corps. any [speaker not understood] here? just one?
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prior to that when i went to college i was always looking at graffiti. i'm originally from wisconsin and there's a lot of gang graffiti back when i was growing up. i was interested in looking at it and seeing the messages that were up there. when i got into the phoenix police department, i worked four years on the road and then i started doing school resource officer. the school resource officer for a couple years where i really, really learned about graffiti. in your presentation, it talked about how the schools, schools are big where they start out, okay. [speaker not understood] at home, but school is where they really get started. in the state of arizona if graffiti is done in school, a cemetery or church, it's an automatic class expeling. anybody here from arizona? where are you from? >> tucson. >> awesome. where are you from? >> i'm from [speaker not understood]. >> you work at the prison? >> [speaker not understood].
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>> the jail, okay. are you guys law enforce. ment in here? any nonlaw enforcement in here? what you do? >> [speaker not understood]. >> sweet. >> [speaker not understood]. >> neighborhood revitalization. >> awesome. we work really, a lot hand in hand in the city of phoenix with our neighborhood services department. by far some of my best friends. we get a lot done. i can't speak enough about them. somebody asked me if [speaker not understood] can come in here. i want to try to keep the media out. i'll tell you guys about that in the future, how we don't really want these people to know, we don't want it out in the media, hey, we just busted somebody because we used facebook to get them. what are the vandals going to do? everything is going to go away. we want to make sure -- i'm telling you right now by no means am i an spederth.
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i will not stand up here and tell you i'm an expert on how to investigate graffiti. i am not an expert to tell you how to use technology. what i want to do with you is to show you what i have done that has been successful for me to get vandals arrested. and what we did is pretty good. we use a couple things. anybody ever heard of graffiti tracker? you haven't? awesome program, right. if you guys don't have graffiti tracker yet, we're going to talk about graffiti tracker. that's one of the biggest things i use. when i first came to this detail, i was a body hate crimes school violence detector when i first came to this detail. next thing they said, budget cuts. they got rid of school violence for some reason and then gave me graffiti. i was like, ah, hell no, graffiti? [laughter] >> hey, when you work the road, you get that hot

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